Two Sundance Film Festival premiered movies—Don Jon (formerly Don Jon's Addiction) and Adore (aka Two Mothers) have made the “porniest” list compiled by the Culture and Media Institute as part of its fight “to preserve and help restore America’s culture, character, traditional values, and morals against the assault of the liberal media elite."

I saw the movies at Sundance and found Don Juan's Addiction, which follows a clueless Lothario’s delight in women, porn and masturbation, thoughtful, funny and, believe it or not, tender. A buff Joseph Gordon-Levitt starred in, wrote and directed this film that CMI ranked No. 1 in porniness. Here's Dan Nailen's review.

Frankly, I was betting against Don Jon, which does contain a lot of sizzling sex scenes, ever being commercially released. I'm pleased it has been and I plan to see it again to see how much content has been cut. (I expect to see DNews uber-critic Chris Hicks there.) BTW, Don Jon has also been labeled "racist" (along with Robert DeNiro, The Sopranos and Bob the Builder) by an Italian-American group.

Of Two Mothers (retitled Adore), I was not so enamoured. From my review:

The two most beautiful moms in Australia have the continent's two hunkiest surfer sons and live in two beautiful homes overlooking a breathtaking bay—complete with dolphins— (for fun, let's just call it Blue Lagoon). Did I mention that Roz runs an art gallery and Lil works for a yacht designer?

Adore? After the premiere, I offered a selection of titles for Naomi Watts and Robin Wright's vanity project: “MILFs Down Under,” “Cougars in Paradise” and “Mommys' Mid-life Fantasy.” Nevertheless, I'm glad Sundance screens edgy in sometimes self-indulgent films.

The Sutherland Insitute must feel validated by the hillbillies at the Culture and Media Institute. Utah's conservative self-described think tank warned Sundance about objectionable film content: "We are a family friendly state and we endeavor to be so because we value the benefits that strong families bring to society." 

Bob Redford responded: “Sometimes the narrowest mind barks the loudest.” he says. Oh, by the way, he added, if Sundance left the state, Utah would take an $80 million hit to the its economy.

Apparently, the state of Utah and Park City like Sundance's film choices—they extended public subsidies for the festival.