Increasingly, food is politics.

Big issues like economics, population growth, climate change and globalization all affect the basic issue of humans getting enough clean food to eat policy determines how we handle those big issues. 

This may sound like dry, but it's hot stuff and we all need to know about it. So it might be a good idea to tune in next week when Eric Holt-Giménez speaks at the U. Executive director of Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy, a “peoples’ think-and-do tank” dedicated to eliminating the injustices that cause hunger and environmental degradation, Dr. Holt-Giménez lived and worked in Latin America where he helped organize and train farm leaders in agroecology, and was a consultant to non-governmental organizations, government ministries, and foreign aid agencies. He'll be giving two talks: 

Social Soup – “Food Security, Food Justice, or Food Sovereignty: Transforming the Global Food System”

Tuesday, September 3, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Gould Auditorium, Marriott Library

The global food system is inequitable, unsustainable, and – despite a surplus of food – incapable of ending hunger.  Ironically, over 70% of the planet’s 1 billion hungry are farmers, producing half the world’s food.  In the United States, the richest and most productive country on earth, nearly 50 million people are food insecure.  The most severe cases are found in the food industry itself, among the people who harvest, process, and serve our food.  The transformation of our global food system depends on political will and the power of social movements.

 

Social Justice Series – “Farm Workers Rights, Food Regimes, and Food Movements”

Tuesday, September 3, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Okazaki Community Meeting Room (155-B), College of Social Work (map)

Farmworkers and food workers have played a foundational role in creating the wealth and shaping the structure of today’s Corporate Food Regime.  Our modern food system would not function without them.  Nevertheless, they are the most vulnerable and food insecure sector in the United States, and suffer egregious human rights abuses such as human trafficking and modern day slavery.  The growing US food movement challenges the inhumane, inequitable, and unsustainable status quo of the “Food Regime” and presents challenges and opportunities for alliances between farmworkers, food workers, family farmers, and socially conscious consumers.

 

Presenter Eric Holt-Giménez, PhD, is the executive director of Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy, a “peoples’ think-and-do tank” dedicated to eliminating the injustices that cause hunger and environmental degradation.  Throughout the 1970s, ‘80s, and ‘90s, Dr. Holt-Giménez lived and worked in Latin America where he helped organize and train farm leaders in agroecology, and was a consultant to non-governmental organizations, government ministries, and foreign aid agencies.  In his path-breaking participatory research, “Measuring Farmer’s Agroecological Resistance to Hurricane Mitch,” 2,000 farmers documented the superior sustainability of agro ecologically-managed farms to conventional farms in Central America.

 

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