The homes of tomorrow are on the drawing board and the floor plans look nothing like the places we remember from our childhood. The ever-changing patterns of our lives are reshaping the way architects and homebuyers design and build. So, what will the homes of the future look like? At the cutting-edge of home design there are a few trends that stand out:


Photo and credit: Sierra Pacific Windows

Flexibility

Changing lifestyles call for changing living spaces. Tomorrow's homes include movable partitions, sliding doors and pocket doors to allow flexibility in living arrangements. My favorite is the NanaWall Folding Glass Wall and the Sierra Pacific Bi-Fold Door System. Multi-purpose family areas are replacing formal dining and living rooms and floor plans are adapting private "bonus" rooms, easily customized into an office space, game room, a small in-home theater or gym.


Photo and credit: DesignAwards.Wordpress.com

Universal Accessibility

Forget the spiral staircases, elevated or sunken living rooms and ultra high cabinets that extend to the ceiling. Tomorrow’s homes will be easy to function and move around in, especially for those with physical limitations. Architects use the phrase "universal design" to describe these homes because they are livable and comfortable for people of all abilities and ages. Wide hallways are another common feature of universally designed homes, as are curb-less, walk-in showers and “comfort height” (taller) toilets in bathrooms.


Photo and credit: HGTVRemodels.com

Abundant storage

Historically closets were scarce in homes of the past, but more storage space has become a basic requisite for homebuyers. Newer homes feature spacious walk-in closets, generous dressing rooms and plenty of easy-to-reach built-in cabinets, cubbies and shelving. Cathedral and vaulted ceilings are on their way out because families prefer to utilize any available space beneath the roof. Garages have also increased in size in order to accommodate oversized SUVs.

Michele Wheeler is the VP, Architecture + Design for Denton House Design Studio in Salt Lake City | dentonhouse.com